Important Tests to Diagnose Diabetes

Symptoms of severe increased thirst, frequent urination, unexplained weight loss, increased hunger, tingling of your hands or feet indicates to run a test for diabetes.
To confirm the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, your doctor will order a fasting plasma glucose test or casual plasma glucose. The fasting plasma glucose test (FPG) is the preferred method for diagnosing diabetes, because it is easy to do, convenient, and less expensive than other tests. Before taking the blood glucose test, you will not be allowed to eat anything for at least eight hours. During a blood glucose test, blood will be drawn and sent to a lab for analysis.
Normal fasting blood glucose -- or blood sugar -- is between 70 and 100 milligrams per deciliter or mg/dL for people who do not have diabetes. The standard diagnosis of diabetes is made when two separate blood tests show that your fasting blood glucose level is greater than or equal to 126 mg/dL.
The casual plasma glucose test is another method of diagnosing diabetes. During the test, blood sugar is tested without regard to the time since the person's last meal. You are not required to abstain from eating prior to the test.
A glucose level greater than 200 mg/dL may indicate diabetes, especially if the test is repeated at a later time and shows similar results.
The hemoglobin A1c test (also called the glycated hemoglobin test or HbA1c), is an important diabetes blood test used to determine how well your diabetes is being controlled. This diabetes test provides an average of your blood sugar control over a six- to 12-week period and is used in conjunction with home blood sugar monitoring to make adjustments in your diabetes medicines. The HbA1c level can also be used to diagnose diabetes if a value of equal to or greater than 6.5% is found.
Along with the hemoglobin A1c test, it's important for people with diabetes to have a dilated eye exam at least once a year as part of a complete eye exam. This important test can detect early signs of retinopathy, which may have no symptoms at first. A foot exam once or twice a year -- or at every doctor's visit -- is also imperative to detect decreased circulation and sores that may not be healing. Early detection of eye and foot problems in diabetes allows your doctor to prescribe proper treatment when it is most effective.

  • Diagnosing Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT)
  • Hemoglobin A1C Test
  • Diabetes and Blood Pressure
  • Diabetes Foot Exam
  • Lipids-Blood Fats
  • Estimation of GFR for Physiology of Kidneys
  • Diabetes Eye Exam

Related Conference of Important Tests to Diagnose Diabetes

November 21-22, 2018

14th World Congress on Endocrinology & Diabetes

Paris, France
November 26-27, 2018

26th International Diabetes and Healthcare Conference

Helsinki, Finland
November 26-27, 2018

13th European Diabetes and Endocrinology Congress

Dublin, Ireland
February 27-28, 2019

Asia Pacific Diabetes and Endocrinology Congress

Tokyo, Japan

April 17-18, 2019

21st Asia Pacific Diabetes Conference

Osaka,Japan
April 29-30, 2019

2nd Global Meeting on Diabetes and Endocrinology

Istanbul, Turkey
June 10-11, 2019

28th European Diabetes Congress

|| Edinburgh, Scotland
July 24-25, 2019

29th World Diabetes & Heart Congress

Melbourne, Australia
July 29-30, 2019

12th International Conference on Diabetes & Metabolism

Chicago | Illinois| USA
Oct 03-04, 2019

Euro Diabetes Congress & Expo

| Paris, France

Important Tests to Diagnose Diabetes Conference Speakers

Recommended Sessions

Related Journals

Are you interested in